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Sports Physicals at

Murphy Wainer

WHAT IS A SPORTS PHYSICAL?

A sports physical exam is also known as a preparticipation physical examination (PPE). The exam helps determine whether it's safe for your child to participate in a particular sport. The North Carolina High School Athletic Association requires annual sports physicals for all participating students. But even if a PPE isn't required for your child, physicians still highly recommend getting one. You should plan to have your physical about 6 weeks before the season begins for your child's sport so there's enough time to follow up on something, if necessary.

WHAT’S INVOLVED?

A sports physical consists of two parts: medical history and a physical exam. The medical history questionnaire is filled out by the parent and includes information about family medical history and the student's past illnesses or injuries. It's important to answer the questions as well as you can. Try not to guess or to give answers you think your doctor wants. The physical exam includes checking the child's height and weight, and blood pressure and pulse. The doctor will also evaluate posture, joints, strength, and flexibility, and test the child's vision. The physician may also ask questions about the child’s health habits. At the end of your exam, the doctor will either fill out and sign the form if everything checks out OK. In some cases, he or she may recommend a follow-up exam, additional tests, or treatment for medical issues.
Three school-age boys in uniforms are playing soccer on a field with a goal in the background. Two of them, from different teams, are trying to kick the ball at the same time.

WHEN TO GET A SPORTS PHYSICAL

A sports physical is important to help you discover and deal with any health issues that might interfere with your child's participation in a sport. The physician can identify risk factors that are linked to specific sports and make recommendations that could help your child avoid injuries. Getting a sports physical once a year is usually adequate. You should also get checked out after healing from a major injury before you start practicing or playing again.
ON-SITE
AFTER HOURS ORTHOPEDIC
A drawing of a patient lying on a physical therapy table while a therapist helps him work on his leg exercises.
A drawing of a patient on crutches standing next to a physician with a clipboard
COPYRIGHT © MURPHY WAINER ORTHOPEDIC SPECIALISTS ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. WEB DEVELOPMENT BY A BETTER WEB, INC.

Sports Physicals at

Murphy Wainer

WHAT IS A

SPORTS

PHYSICAL?

A sports physical exam is also known as a preparticipation physical examination (PPE). The exam helps determine whether it's safe for your child to participate in a particular sport. The North Carolina High School Athletic Association requires annual sports physicals for all participating students. But even if a PPE isn't required for your child, physicians still highly recommend getting one. You should plan to have your physical about 6 weeks before the season begins for your child's sport so there's enough time to follow up on something, if necessary.

WHAT’S INVOLVED?

A sports physical consists of two parts: medical history and a physical exam. The medical history questionnaire is filled out by the parent and includes information about family medical history and the student's past illnesses or injuries. It's important to answer the questions as well as you can. Try not to guess or to give answers you think your doctor wants. The physical exam includes checking the child's height and weight, and blood pressure and pulse. The doctor will also evaluate posture, joints, strength, and flexibility, and test the child's vision. The physician may also ask questions about the child’s health habits. At the end of your exam, the doctor will either fill out and sign the form if everything checks out OK. In some cases, he or she may recommend a follow-up exam, additional tests, or treatment for medical issues.

WHEN TO GET A SPORTS PHYSICAL

A sports physical is important to help you discover and deal with any health issues that might interfere with your child's participation in a sport. The physician can identify risk factors that are linked to specific sports and make recommendations that could help your child avoid injuries. Getting a sports physical once a year is usually adequate. You should also get checked out after healing from a major injury before you start practicing or playing again.
Three school-age boys in uniforms are playing soccer on a field with a goal in the background. Two of them, from different teams, are trying to kick the ball at the same time.
A Division of Southeastern Orthopaedic Specialists, P.A.
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